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George Santos lied to judge about working at Goldman Sachs in 2017

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Lying George Santos “embellished his resume” before a Seattle judge in 2017, when he falsely claimed to work for Goldman Sachs in open court.

In the latest revelation about the embattled Long Island Republican congressman’s fabulism, Politico surfaced a recording of Santos trotting out his fake credentials during a court appearance made on behalf of a “family friend” who ultimately pleaded guilty to an ATM skimming scheme.

“So what do you do for work?” King County Superior Court Judge Sean O’Donnell asked Santos during a bail hearing for defendant Gustavo Ribeiro Trelha, Politico reported.

“I am an aspiring politician and I work for Goldman Sachs,” Santos said in reply.

“You work for Goldman Sachs in New York?” O’Donnell clarified.

“Yup,” said Santos.


A picture of George Santos.
Santos now faces multiple state and federal probes into his campaign and has faced bipartisan calls to resign.
AFP via Getty Images

Santos admitted to some of his serial lies in an interview with The Post in December, acknowledging that he fabricated key details of his personal and professional resume ahead of November’s election.

“My sins here are embellishing my resume. I’m sorry,” Santos said as a firestorm swirled around him as he awaited his swearing-in to Congress.

Among the embellishments was a confession that he had “never worked directly” for Goldman Sachs and Citigroup — something Santos chalked up to a “poor choice of words.”


King County Superior Court Judge Sean O'Donnell.
“So what do you do for work?” Judge Sean O’Donnell asked Santos during a bail hearing for defendant Gustavo Ribeiro Trelha.
Twitter/@odonnell4judge

Santos claimed he had actually worked as a vice president at a different company, Link Bridge, and worked with both financial giants through “limited partnerships” they had with the firm.

Trelha, who was ultimately deported to Brazil in early 2018 after serving seven months in jail, told Politico Santos also lied about their relationship.

Santos had told the judge the two were family friends whose parents knew each other in Brazil. Trelha said he met Santos in the fall of 2016 on a Facebook group for Brazilians living in Orlando, Florida, and that his mother died in 2012. The two had shared an apartment in Florida before Santos returned to New York, the story said.

Legal experts were skeptical Santos would face any consequences over the issue.

Barry N. Covert, a longtime New York litigation attorney. told The Post the fibs before a judge could be considered felony perjury, but that charges weren’t likely as “the statute of limitations has almost certainly passed.”

“The perjury allegation is a viable potential case,” Jonathan Turley, a George Washington University law professor, agreed. “But it is unlikely to be subject of a criminal charge.”

Santos, whose victory in a Democratic-leaning district in the 2022 midterms was initially hailed as one of the Republican party’s biggest upsets of the night, now faces multiple state and federal probes into his campaign and has faced bipartisan calls to resign.

Santos did not immediately respond to requests for comment from The Post.

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